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Mixed Race America And The Law

Mixed Race America and the Law PDF

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Author: Kevin R. Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814742572
Size: 74.42 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 505
View: 4936

Book Description: This ground-breaking anthology examines the mixed race experience and the impact of law on mixed race citizens in America.


Lawyers Ethics And The Pursuit Of Social Justice

Lawyers  Ethics and the Pursuit of Social Justice PDF

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Author: Susan D. Carle
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814716397
Size: 14.81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 425
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Book Description: Susan D. Carle centers this collection of texts on the premise that legal ethics should be far more than a set of rules on professional responsibility.


Troubling The Family

Troubling the Family PDF

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Author: Habiba Ibrahim
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816679185
Size: 66.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 218
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Book Description: Troubling the Family argues that the emergence of multiracialism during the 1990s was determined by underlying and unacknowledged gender norms. Opening with a germinal moment for multiracialism—the seemingly massive and instantaneous popular appearance of Tiger Woods in 1997—Habiba Ibrahim examines how the shifting status of racial hero for both black and multiracial communities makes sense only by means of an account of masculinity. Ibrahim looks across historical events and memoirs—beginning with the Loving v. Virginia case in 1967 when miscegenation laws were struck down—to reveal that gender was the starting point of an analytics that made categorical multiracialism, and multiracial politics, possible. Producing a genealogy of multiracialism's gendered basis allows Ibrahim to focus on a range of stakeholders whose interests often ran against the grain of what the multiracial movement of the 1990s often privileged: the sanctity of the heteronormative family, the labor of child rearing, and more precise forms of racial tabulation—all of which, when taken together, could form the basis for creating so-called neutral personhood. Ibrahim concludes with a consideration of Barack Obama as a representation of the resurrection of the assurance that multiracialism extended into the 2000s: a version of personhood with no memory of its own gendered legacy, and with no self-account of how it became so masculine that it can at once fill the position of political leader and the promise of the end of politics.


Discrimination By Default

Discrimination by Default PDF

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Author: Lu-in Wang
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814795064
Size: 61.94 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 187
View: 7041

Book Description: Much as we “select” computer settings by default—reflexively, without thinking, and sometimes without realizing there are other options—we often discriminate by default as well. And just as default computer settings tend to become locked in or entrenched as the standard, discrimination by default creates a situation in which disparate outcomes are expected, accepted, and taken for granted. The killing of Amadou Diallo, racial disparities in medical care, the dominance of Whites and men in certain professions, and even the uneven media attention paid to crimes depending on their victims’ race and class, all might be cases of discrimination by, or as, default. Wang contends that, today, most discrimination occurs by default and not design, making legal prohibitions that focus on those who discriminate out of ill will inadequate to redress the largest share of modern discrimination. She draws on social psychology to detail three ways in which unconscious assumptions can lead to discrimination, showing how they play out in a range of everyday settings. Wang then demonstrates how these dynamics interact in medical care to produce an invisible, self-fulfilling, and self-perpetuating prophecy of racial disparity. She goes on to suggest ways in which institutions and individuals might recognize, interrupt, and override the discriminatory default.


Blood

Blood PDF

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Author: Gil Anidjar
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231537255
Size: 34.26 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 560
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Book Description: Blood, according to Gil Anidjar, maps the singular history of Christianity. As a category for historical analysis, blood can be seen through its literal and metaphorical uses as determining, sometimes even defining Western culture, politics, and social practices and their wide-ranging incarnations in nationalism, capitalism, and law. Engaging with a variety of sources, Anidjar explores the presence and the absence, the making and unmaking of blood in philosophy and medicine, law and literature, and economic and political thought from ancient Greece to medieval Spain, from the Bible to Shakespeare and Melville. The prevalence of blood in the social, juridical, and political organization of the modern West signals that we do not live in a secular age into which religion could return. Flowing across multiple boundaries, infusing them with violent precepts that we must address, blood undoes the presumed oppositions between religion and politics, economy and theology, and kinship and race. It demonstrates that what we think of as modern is in fact imbued with Christianity. Christianity, Blood fiercely argues, must be reconsidered beyond the boundaries of religion alone.


America S Colony

America s Colony PDF

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Author: Pedro A Malavet
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814756808
Size: 52.98 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 242
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Book Description: Everyone eats, but rarely do we ask why or investigate why we eat what we eat. Why do we love spices, sweets, coffee? How did rice become such a staple food throughout so much of eastern Asia? Everyone Eats examines the social and cultural reasons for our food choices and provides an explanation of the nutritional reasons for why humans eat, resulting in a unique cultural and biological approach to the topic. E. N. Anderson explains the economics of food in the globalization era, food's relationship to religion, medicine, and ethnicity as well as offers suggestions on how to end hunger, starvation, and malnutrition. Everyone Eats feeds our need to understand human ecology by explaining the ways that cultures and political systems structure the edible environment.


Opening The Floodgates

Opening the Floodgates PDF

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Author: Kevin R. Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814743005
Size: 58.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 289
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Book Description: Seeking to re-imagine the meaning and significance of the international border, Opening the Floodgates makes a case for eliminating the border as a legal construct that impedes the movement of people into this country. Open migration policies deserve fuller analysis, as evidenced by President Barack Obama’s pledge to make immigration reform a priority. Kevin R. Johnson offers an alternative vision of how U.S. borders might be reconfigured, grounded in moral, economic, and policy arguments for open borders. Importantly, liberalizing migration through an open borders policy would recognize that the enforcement of closed borders cannot stifle the strong, perhaps irresistible, economic, social, and political pressures that fuel international migration. Controversially, Johnson suggests that open borders are entirely consistent with efforts to prevent terrorism that have dominated immigration enforcement since the events of September 11, 2001. More liberal migration, he suggests, would allow for full attention to be paid to the true dangers to public safety and national security.


Postwar Anti Racism

Postwar Anti Racism PDF

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Author: Anthony Q. Hazard
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137003847
Size: 62.34 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 252
View: 1797

Book Description: This book explores the discourse and practice of anti-racism in the first two decades following World War II, uncovering the ways scientific and cultural discourses of 'race' continued to circulate in the early period of contemporary globalization through the lens on UNESCO.


Saving Our Children From The First Amendment

Saving Our Children from the First Amendment PDF

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Author: Kevin W. Saunders
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814786936
Size: 16.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Law
Languages : en
Pages : 307
View: 1469

Book Description: The First Amendment is vital to our political system, our cultural institutions, and our routine social interactions with others. In this provocative book, Kevin Saunders asserts that freedom of expression can be very harmful to our children, making it more likely that they will be the perpetrators or victims of violence, will grow up as racists, or will use alcohol or tobacco. Saving Our Children from the First Amendment examines both the value and cost of free expression in America, demonstrating how an unregulated flow of information can be detrimental to youth. While the great value of the First Amendment is found in its protection of our most important political freedoms, this is far more significant for adults, who can fully grasp and benefit from the freedom of expression, than for children. Constitutional prohibitions on distributing sexual materials to children, Saunders proposes, should be expanded to include violent, vulgar, or profane materials, as well as music that contains hate speech. Saunders offers an insightful meditation on the problem of protecting our children from the negative effects of freedom of expression without curtailing First Amendment rights for adults.


Soldiers In The Army Of Freedom

Soldiers in the Army of Freedom PDF

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Author: Ian Michael Spurgeon
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806147210
Size: 64.99 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 456
View: 6304

Book Description: It was 1862, the second year of the Civil War, though Kansans and Missourians had been fighting over slavery for almost a decade. For the 250 Union soldiers facing down rebel irregulars on Enoch Toothman’s farm near Butler, Missouri, this was no battle over abstract principles. These were men of the First Kansas Colored Infantry, and they were fighting for their own freedom and that of their families. They belonged to the first black regiment raised in a northern state, and the first black unit to see combat during the Civil War. Soldiers in the Army of Freedom is the first published account of this largely forgotten regiment and, in particular, its contribution to Union victory in the trans-Mississippi theater of the Civil War. As such, it restores the First Kansas Colored Infantry to its rightful place in American history. Composed primarily of former slaves, the First Kansas Colored saw major combat in Missouri, Indian Territory, and Arkansas. Ian Michael Spurgeon draws upon a wealth of little-known sources—including soldiers’ pension applications—to chart the intersection of race and military service, and to reveal the regiment’s role in countering white prejudices by defying stereotypes. Despite naysayers’ bigoted predictions—and a merciless slaughter at the Battle of Poison Spring—these black soldiers proved themselves as capable as their white counterparts, and so helped shape the evolving attitudes of leading politicians, such as Kansas senator James Henry Lane and President Abraham Lincoln. A long-overdue reconstruction of the regiment’s remarkable combat record, Spurgeon’s book brings to life the men of the First Kansas Colored Infantry in their doubly desperate battle against the Confederate forces and skepticism within Union ranks.