DownloadPDF

Home   /   DownloadPDF
DownloadPDF


by


The Cambridge Companion to Christian Mysticism
by Amy Hollywood, Patricia Z. Beckman

The Cambridge Companion to Christian Mysticism is a multi-authored interdisciplinary guide to the study of Christian mysticism, with an emphasis on the third through the seventeenth centuries. The book is thematically organized in terms of the central contexts, practices, and concepts associated with the mystical life in early, medieval, and early modern Christianity. Written by leading authorities and younger scholars from a range of disciplines, the volume both provides a clear introduction to the Christian mystical life and articulates a bold new approach to the study of mysticism. The book looks beyond the term “mysticism,” which was an early modern invention, to explore the ways in the ancient terms “mystic” and “mystical” were used in the Christian tradition: What kinds of practices, modes of life, and experiences were described as “mystical”? What understanding of Christianity and of the life of Christian perfection is articulated through mystical interpretations of scripture, mystical contemplation, mystical vision, mystical theology, or mystical union? What practices and experiences provided the framework within which one could describe mystical phenomena? And what topics are at the forefront of the contemporary study of Christian mystical practice and experience?

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Mysticism
by Samuel Fanous, Vincent Gillespie

The widespread view that ‘mystical’ activity in the Middle Ages was a rarefied enterprise of a privileged spiritual elite has led to isolation of the medieval ‘mystics’ into a separate, narrowly defined category. Taking the opposite view, this book shows how individual mystical experience, such as those recorded by Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe, is rooted in, nourished and framed by the richly distinctive spiritual contexts of the period. Arranged by sections corresponding to historical developments, it explores the primary vernacular texts, their authors, and the contexts that formed the expression and exploration of mystical experiences in medieval England. This is an excellent, insightful introduction to medieval English mystical texts, their authors, readers and communities. Featuring a guide to further reading and a chronology, the Companion offers an accessible overview for students of literature, history and theology.

A Companion to Medieval English Literature and Culture, c.1350 – c.1500
by Peter Brown

A Companion to Medieval English Literature and Culture, c.1350-c.1500 challenges readers to think beyond a narrowly defined canon and conventional disciplinary boundaries.

A ground-breaking collection of newly-commissioned essays on medieval literature and culture.

  • Encourages students to think beyond a narrowly defined canon and conventional disciplinary boundaries.
  • Reflects the erosion of the traditional, rigid boundary between medieval and early modern literature.
  • Stresses the importance of constructing contexts for reading literature.
  • Explores the extent to which medieval literature is in dialogue with other cultural products, including the literature of other countries, manuscripts and religion.
  • Includes close readings of frequently-studied texts, including texts by Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain poet, and Hoccleve.
  • Confronts some of the controversies that exercise students of medieval literature, such as those connected with literary theory, love, and chivalry and war.

A Companion to Jesuit Mysticism
by Robert Aleksander Maryks

In A Companion to Jesuit Mysticism, Robert A. Maryks provides thirteen unique essays discussing the Jesuit mystical tradition, a somewhat neglected aspect of Jesuit historiography that stretches as far back as the order’s co-founder, Ignatius of Loyola, his spiritual visions at Manresa, and ultimately the mystical perspective contained in his Spiritual Exercises.

A Companion to John of Ruusbroec
by

This Companion offers a comprehensive overview of research into the life, work, and influence of John of Ruusbroec (1293-1381). In addition, it contains the first English translation of a series of Middle Dutch texts related to Ruusbroec and his context.

The Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion
by Robert A. Segal

This prestigious Companion offers the most comprehensive survey to date of the study of religion. Featuring a team of international contributors, and edited by one of the most widely respected scholars in the field, The Blackwell Companion to the Study of Religion provides an interdisciplinary and authoritative guide to the subject.

  • Examines the main approaches to the study of religion: anthropology, the comparative method, economics, literature, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and theology.
  • Also covers a diverse range of topical issues, such as the body, fundamentalism, magic, and new religious movements
  • Consists of 24 essays written by an outstanding team of international scholars
  • Reviews, within each chapter, an outline of a particular subfield and traces its development up to the present day
  • Debates how the discipline may look in the future
  • Represents all the major issues, methods and positions in the field

A New Companion to Hispanic Mysticism
by Hilaire Kallendorf

Winner of the 2011 Roland H. Bainton Prize for Reference Works

The Student’s Companion to the Theologians
by Ian S. Markham

This companion brings together a team of contemporary theologians and writers to provide substantial introductions to the key people who shaped the Christian story and tradition.

  • A substantial reference work, bringing together over 75 entries on the most important and influential theologians in the history of Christianity
  • Structured accessibly around five periods: early centuries, middle ages, reformation period, the Enlightenment, and the twentieth-century to the present
  • A to Z entries range from substantial essays to shorter overviews, each of which locates the theologian in their immediate context, summarizes the themes of their work, and explains their significance
  • Covers a broad span of theologians, from Augustine to Thomas Aquinas, through to C. S. Lewis, James Cone, and Rosemary Radford Reuther
  • Provides profiles of key Catholic, protestant, evangelical, and progressive theologians
  • Includes a useful timeline to orientate the reader, reading lists, and a glossary of key terms

Edinburgh Companion to Scottish Women’s Writing
by Glenda Norquay

By combining historical spread with a thematic structure, this volume explores the ways in which gender has shaped literary output and addresses the changing situations in which Scottish women lived and wrote.