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Teaching Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises
by Peter L. Hays

Professor Peter L. Hays, an experienced teacher, has gathered together seasoned instructors who teach Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises throughout the country, in different colleges and high schools, and in different styles. An informative collection of approaches to the presentation of The Sun Also Rises, this volume provides historic background, glosses arcane references, presents critical interpretations, and offers methodologies to inspire teachers of college and high-school students. From material on the bitter aftermath of World War I and the “Lost Generation,” to current theories on the construction and performance of gender, the book provides everything today’s teachers need to develop and explain the themes in this classic of modern literature. Book jacket.

The Critical Reception of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises
by Peter L. Hays

In the eight decades since its publication, Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, like a Rorschach blot, has measured not only critics’ opinions of Hemingway but also the critical temper of the times. An initial reviewer saw the book as a satire on American expatriates, an unflattering portrait of wastrels and a nymphomaniac wandering Europe. Other critics of the time saw it as a reflection of post-First World War malaise, inscribing for history the Lost Generation – those critics, that is, who took it as a serious literary effort and did not simply dismiss it as pornographic, as Hemingway’s own parents did. Since then the novel has been interpreted, variously, as a study of an impotent man’s existential dilemma, re-read as a modern-day version of the Fisher King myth, attacked by feminist critics as the macho diatribe of a misogynist, and, most recently, seen as a study of gender roles and the performance of masculinity. There is no other book that surveys the entire span of The Sun Also Rises criticism, documents the fashionable waves in which criticism has traveled, and points out how each age interprets the novel to suit itself, reflecting the cultural concerns of the moment.

Peter Hays is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of California, Davis.ism, documents the fashionable waves in which criticism has traveled, and points out how each age interprets the novel to suit itself, reflecting the cultural concerns of the moment.

Peter Hays is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of California, Davis.ism, documents the fashionable waves in which criticism has traveled, and points out how each age interprets the novel to suit itself, reflecting the cultural concerns of the moment.

Peter Hays is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of California, Davis.ism, documents the fashionable waves in which criticism has traveled, and points out how each age interprets the novel to suit itself, reflecting the cultural concerns of the moment.

Peter Hays is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of California, Davis.


Teaching Modernist Anglophone Literature
by

Teaching Modernist Anglophone Literature features “make-it-new” classroom approaches to modernist authors with an emphasis on inspiring pedagogy grounded in educational theory and contemporary digital media. It includes innovative project ideas, assignments, and examples of student work.

The Critics and Hemingway, 1924-2014
by Laurence W. Mazzeno

Hemingway burst on the literary scene in the 1920s with spare, penetrating short stories and brilliant novels. Soon he was held as a standard for modern writers. Meanwhile, he used his celebrity to create a persona like the stoic, macho heroes of his fiction. After a decline during the 1930s and 1940s, he came roaring back with The Old Man and the Sea in 1952. Two years later he received the Nobel Prize.
While his popularity waxed and waned during his lifetime, Hemingway’s reputation among scholars remained strong as long as traditional scholarship dominated. New approaches beginning in the 1960s brought a sea change, however, finding grave fault with his work and making him a figure ripe for vilification. Yet during this time scholarship on him continued to appear. His works still sell well, and several are staples on high-school and college syllabi. A new scholarly edition of his letters is drawing prominent attention, and there is a resurgence in scholarly attention to – and approbation for – his work. Tracing Hemingway’s critical fortunes tells us something about what we value in literature and why reputations rise and fall as scholars find new ways to examine and interpret creative work.

Laurence W. Mazzeno is President Emeritus of Alvernia University. Among other books, he has written volumes on Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, Updike, and Matthew Arnold for Camden House’s Literary Criticism in Perspective series.

s work. Tracing Hemingway’s critical fortunes tells us something about what we value in literature and why reputations rise and fall as scholars find new ways to examine and interpret creative work.

Laurence W. Mazzeno is President Emeritus of Alvernia University. Among other books, he has written volumes on Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, Updike, and Matthew Arnold for Camden House’s Literary Criticism in Perspective series.

s work. Tracing Hemingway’s critical fortunes tells us something about what we value in literature and why reputations rise and fall as scholars find new ways to examine and interpret creative work.

Laurence W. Mazzeno is President Emeritus of Alvernia University. Among other books, he has written volumes on Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, Updike, and Matthew Arnold for Camden House’s Literary Criticism in Perspective series.

s work. Tracing Hemingway’s critical fortunes tells us something about what we value in literature and why reputations rise and fall as scholars find new ways to examine and interpret creative work.

Laurence W. Mazzeno is President Emeritus of Alvernia University. Among other books, he has written volumes on Austen, Dickens, Tennyson, Updike, and Matthew Arnold for Camden House’s Literary Criticism in Perspective series.


Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises
by Harold Bloom

Published in 1926, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises quickly established the author as one of the great writers of his time. Based on Hemingway’s experiences, The Sun Also Rises is the story of a group of American and English expatriates living in Paris who take an excursion to Pamplona, Spain. The novel has forever associated Hemingway with bullfights and the running of the bulls. This powerful work of modern fiction, filled with memorable characters and universal themes, is summarized in this volume, which is enhanced by thought-provoking critical extracts, focused biographical details, and an annotated bibliography.

Teaching Anglophone Caribbean Literature
by Supriya M. Nair

This volume recognizes that the most challenging aspect of introducing students to anglophone Caribbean literature—the sheer variety of intellectual and artistic traditions in Western and non-Western cultures that relate to it—also offers the greatest opportunities to teachers. Courses on anglophone literature in the Caribbean can consider the region’s specific histories and contexts even as they explore common issues: the legacies of slavery, colonialism, and colonial education; nationalism; exile and migration; identity and hybridity; class and racial conflict; gender and sexuality; religion and ritual. This volume considers how the availability of materials shapes syllabuses and recommends print, digital, and visual resources for teaching.

The essays examine a host of topics, including the following:

  • the development of multiethnic populations in the Caribbean and the role of various creole languages in the literature
  • oral art forms, such as dub poetry and reggae music
  • the influence of anglophone literature in the Caribbean on literary movements outside it, such as the Harlem Renaissance and black British writing
  • Carnival
  • religious rituals and beliefs
  • specific genres such as slave narratives and autobiography
  • film and drama
  • the economics of rum

Many essays list resources for further reading, and the volume concludes with a section of additional teaching resources.


Fifty Years of Hemingway Criticism
by Peter L. Hays

A master of short story, novel, and nonfiction prose, Ernest Hemingway has been the subject of countless books, articles, and biographies. The Nobel–prize winning author and his work continue to interest academics, whose studies of his personal life are frequently intertwined with examinations of his writing.

In Fifty Years of Hemingway Criticism, noted scholar Peter L. Hays has assembled a career-spanning collection of essays that explore the many facets of Hemingway—his life, his contemporaries, and his creative output. Although Hays has published on other writers, Hemingway has been his main research interest, and this selection constitutes five decades of criticism. Arranged by subject matter, these essays focus on the novels The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea, as well as the short stories “The Undefeated,” “The Killers,” “Soldier’s Home,” and “A Clean Well-Lighted Place.” Other chapters explore Hemingway’s relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald; teaching Hemingway in the classroom; and comparing Hemingway’s work to writers such as Eugene O’Neill, Ford Madox Ford, and William Faulkner.

When first published, some of these essays offered original views and insights that have since become standard interpretations, making them invaluable to readers. Easily accessible by both general readers and academic scholars, Fifty Years of Hemingway Criticism is an essential collection on one of America’s greatest writers.


The Sun Also Rises
by Connie Hunter-Gillepsie

REA’s MAXnotes for Ernest Hemmingway’s The Sun Also Rises MAXnotes offer a fresh look at masterpieces of literature, presented in a lively and interesting fashion. Written by literary experts who currently teach the subject, MAXnotes will enhance your understanding and enjoyment of the work. MAXnotes are designed to stimulate independent thought about the literary work by raising various issues and thought-provoking ideas and questions. MAXnotes cover the essentials of what one should know about each work, including an overall summary, character lists, an explanation and discussion of the plot, the work’s historical context, illustrations to convey the mood of the work, and a biography of the author. Each section of the work is individually summarized and analyzed, and has study questions and answers.

Reading Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises
by Harry Robert Stoneback

The first volume in an important series of guides to the works of Ernest Hemingway

“The Reading Hemingway series of guides to Ernest Hemingway’s major works of fiction, short stories, and novels are written for students, fellow teachers, and other readers who share an interest in the works of one of America’s, and indeed the world’s, outstanding writers…. The books in this series will gloss or annotate, page by page, word by word, if necessary, like a good guidebook to a city or country. These books will not tell Hemingway readers what to think and feel about an action, a character or a place. Rather, the guides point out features and details possibly overlooked or misunderstood by the ‘visitor.’ … These books, side by side with Hemingway’s books, may enrich one’s reading ‘tours.'”–from the Foreword

Designed as an exercise in close reading, this first volume in the series is grounded in narrative and aesthetic concerns, addressing history, local knowledge, actual and symbolic landscape and inscape, and every aspect of the seven-eighths of the story that lies beneath the surface–the submerged iceberg of the fiction. Author H. R. Stoneback equips the reader to sound its depths and take full measure of the novel’s allusiveness, indirection, and understatement. Navigating the labyrinthine text of The Sun Also Rises, Stoneback negotiates its intricate, complex, and interconnected passages and leads the reader ultimately to the center of Hemingway’s vision.


A Study Guide for Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises
by Gale, Cengage Learning

A Study Guide for Ernest Hemingway’s "The Sun Also Rises," excerpted from Gale’s acclaimed Novels for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.